Router Configuration

This article covers Aurelia's router configuration.

Basic Configuration

To use Aurelia's router, your component view must have a <router-view></router-view> element. In order to configure the router, the component's view-model requires a configureRouter() function.


    <template>
       <ul repeat.for="nav of router.navigation">
           <li class="${nav.isActive ? 'active' : ''}"><a href.bind="nav.href">${nav.title}</a></li>
       </ul>
       <router-view></router-view>
    </template>
  

    export class App {
      configureRouter(config, router) {
        this.router = router;
        config.title = 'Aurelia';
        config.map([
          { route: ['', 'home'],       name: 'home',       moduleId: 'home/index' },
          { route: 'users',            name: 'users',      moduleId: 'users/index', nav: true, title: 'Users' },
          { route: 'users/:id/detail', name: 'userDetail', moduleId: 'users/detail' },
          { route: 'files/*path',      name: 'files',      moduleId: 'files/index', nav: 0,    title: 'Files', href:'#files' }
        ]);
      }
    }
  

    import {RouterConfiguration, Router} from 'aurelia-router';

    export class App {
      router: Router;

      configureRouter(config: RouterConfiguration, router: Router): void {
        this.router = router;
        config.title = 'Aurelia';
        config.map([
          { route: ['', 'home'],       name: 'home',       moduleId: 'home/index' },
          { route: 'users',            name: 'users',      moduleId: 'users/index', nav: true, title: 'Users' },
          { route: 'users/:id/detail', name: 'userDetail', moduleId: 'users/detail' },
          { route: 'files/*path',      name: 'files',      moduleId: 'files/index', nav: 0,    title: 'Files', href:'#files' }
        ]);
      }
    }
  
  • config.map() adds route(s) to the router. Although only route, name, moduleId, href and nav are shown above there are other properties that can be included in a route. The interface name for a route is RouteConfig. You can also use config.mapRoute() to add a single route.
  • route - is the pattern to match against incoming URL fragments. It can be a string or array of strings. The route can contain parameterized routes or wildcards as well.
    • Parameterized routes match against a string with a :token parameter (ie: 'users/:id/detail'). An object with the token parameter's name is set as property and passed as a parameter to the route view-model's activate() function.
    • A parameter can be made optional by appending a question mark :token? (ie: users/:id?/detail would match both users/3/detail and users/detail). When an optional parameter is missing from the url, the property passed to activate() is undefined.
    • Wildcard routes are used to match the "rest" of a path (ie: files/*path matches files/new/doc or files/temp). An object with the rest of the URL after the segment is set as the path property and passed as a parameter to activate() as well.
  • href - is a conditionally optional property. If it is not defined then route is used. If route has segments then href is required as in the case of files because the router does not know how to fill out the parameterized portions of the pattern.
  • nav - is a boolean or number property. When set to true the route will be included in the router's navigation model. When specified as number, the value will be used in sorting the routes. This makes it easier to create a dynamic menu or similar elements. The navigation model will be available as array of NavModel in router.navigation. These are the available properties in NavModel:
    • isActive flag which will be true when the associated route is active.
    • title which will be prepended in html title when the associated route is active.
    • href can be used on a tag.
    • config is the object defined in config.map.
    • settings is equal to the property settings of config object.
    • router is a reference for AppRouter.
    • Other properties includes relativeHref and order.

Navigation States

The router contains a number of additional properties that indicate the current status of router navigation. These properties are only set on the base router, i.e. not in child routers. Additionally, these properties are all with respect to browser history which extends past the lifecycle of the router itself.

  • router.isNavigating: true if the router is currently processing a navigation.
  • router.isNavigatingFirst: true if the router is navigating into the app for the first time in the browser session.
  • router.isNavigatingNew: true if the router is navigating to a page instance not in the browser session history. This is triggered when the user clicks a link or the navigate function is called explicitly.
  • router.isNavigatingForward: true if the router is navigating forward in the browser session history. This is triggered when the user clicks the forward button in their browser.
  • router.isNavigatingBack: true if the router is navigating back in the browser session history. This is triggered when the user clicks the back button in their browser or when the navigateBack() function is called.
  • router.isNavigatingRefresh: true if the router is navigating due to a browser refresh.
  • router.isExplicitNavigation: true if the router is navigating due to explicit call to navigate function(s).
  • router.isExplicitNavigationBack: true if the router is navigating due to explicit call to navigateBack function.

Options

Push State

Set config.options.pushState to true to activate push state and add a base tag to the head of your html document. If you're using JSPM, RequireJS or a similar module loader, you will also need to configure it with a base url, corresponding to your base tag's href. Finally, be sure to set the config.options.root to match your base tag's setting.


    export class App {
      configureRouter(config, router) {
        this.router = router;
        config.title = 'Aurelia';
        config.options.pushState = true;
        config.options.root = '/';
        config.map([
          { route: ['', 'home'], name: 'home',  moduleId: 'home/index' },
          { route: 'users',      name: 'users', moduleId: 'users/index', nav: true, title: 'Users' }
        ]);
      }
    }
  

    import {RouterConfiguration, Router} from 'aurelia-router';

    export class App {
      router: Router;

      configureRouter(config: RouterConfiguration, router: Router): void {
        this.router = router;
        config.title = 'Aurelia';
        config.options.pushState = true;
        config.options.root = '/';
        config.map([
          { route: ['', 'home'], name: 'home',  moduleId: 'home/index' },
          { route: 'users',      name: 'users', moduleId: 'users/index', nav: true, title: 'Users' }
        ]);
      }
    }
  

PushState requires server-side support. Don't forget to configure your server appropriately.

Dynamically Specify Route Components

You can add a navigationStrategy to a route to allow dynamic routes. Within the navigation strategy Aurelia requires you to configure instruction.config with the desired moduleId, viewPorts or redirect.


    export class App {
      configureRouter(config, router) {
        this.router = router;
        config.title = 'Aurelia';
        const navStrat = (instruction) => {
          instruction.config.moduleId = instruction.fragment
          instruction.config.href = instruction.fragment
        };
        config.map([
          { route: ['', 'home'],       name: 'home',  moduleId: 'home/index' },
          { route: 'users',            name: 'users', moduleId: 'users/index', nav: true, title: 'Users' },
          { route: ['', 'admin*path'], name: 'route', navigationStrategy: navStrat }
        ]);
      }
    }
  

    import {RouterConfiguration, Router, NavigationInstruction} from 'aurelia-router';

    export class App {
      router: Router;

      configureRouter(config: RouterConfiguration, router: Router): void {
        this.router = router;
        config.title = 'Aurelia';
        const navStrat = (instruction: NavigationInstruction) => {
          instruction.config.moduleId = instruction.fragment
          instruction.config.href = instruction.fragment
        };
        config.map([
          { route: ['', 'home'],       name: 'home',  moduleId: 'home/index' },
          { route: 'users',            name: 'users', moduleId: 'users/index', nav: true, title: 'Users' },
          { route: ['', 'admin*path'], name: 'route', navigationStrategy: navStrat }
        ]);
      }
    }
  

Adding Additional Data To A Route

Although Aurelia does allow you to pass any additional property to a route's configuration object, settings is the default parameter to which you should add arbitrary data that you want to pass to the route.


    export class App {
      configureRouter(config, router) {
        this.router = router;
        config.title = 'Aurelia';
        config.map([
          { route: ['', 'home'], name: 'home',  moduleId: 'home/index' },
          { route: 'users',      name: 'users', moduleId: 'users/index', nav: true, title: 'Users', settings: {data: '...'} }
        ]);
      }
    }
  

    import {RouterConfiguration, Router} from 'aurelia-router';

    export class App {
      router: Router;

      configureRouter(config: RouterConfiguration, router: Router): void {
        this.router = router;
        config.title = 'Aurelia';
        config.map([
          { route: ['', 'home'], name: 'home',  moduleId: 'home/index' },
          { route: 'users',      name: 'users', moduleId: 'users/index', nav: true, title: 'Users', settings: {data: '...'} }
        ]);
      }
    }
  

Case Sensitive Routes

You can set a route to be case sensitive, should you wish:


    export class App {
      configureRouter(config, router) {
        this.router = router;
        config.title = 'Aurelia';
        config.map([
          { route: ['', 'home'], name: 'home',  moduleId: 'home/index' },
          { route: 'users',      name: 'users', moduleId: 'users/index', nav: true, title: 'Users', caseSensitive: true }
        ]);
      }
    }
  

    import {RouterConfiguration, Router} from 'aurelia-router';

    export class App {
      router: Router;

      configureRouter(config: RouterConfiguration, router: Router): void {
        this.router = router;
        config.title = 'Aurelia';
        config.map([
          { route: ['', 'home'], name: 'home',  moduleId: 'home/index' },
          { route: 'users',      name: 'users', moduleId: 'users/index', nav: true, title: 'Users', caseSensitive: true }
        ]);
      }
    }
  

In the above example, our route will only match URL fragment of /users and not /Users, but since the route home is not case sensitive the URL /Home would match. By default Aurelia's routes are not case sensitive.

Handling Unknown Routes

Aurelia allows you to map any unknown routes. Parameters passed to mapUnknownRoutes() can be:

  • A string to a moduleId. This module will be navigated to any time a route is not found.
  • A routeConfig object. This configuration object will be used any time a route is not found.
  • A function which is passed the NavigationInstruction object and can decide the route dynamically.

Using a moduleId for Unknown Routes


  <source-code lang="ES 2015/2016">
    export class App {
      configureRouter(config, router) {
        this.router = router;
        config.title = 'Aurelia';
        config.map([
          { route: ['', 'home'], name: 'home',  moduleId: 'home/index' },
          { route: 'users',      name: 'users', moduleId: 'users/index', nav: true, title: 'Users' }
        ]);

        config.mapUnknownRoutes('not-found');
      }
    }
  

    import {RouterConfiguration, Router} from 'aurelia-router';

    export class App {
      router: Router;

      configureRouter(config: RouterConfiguration, router: Router): void {
        this.router = router;
        config.title = 'Aurelia';
        config.map([
          { route: ['', 'home'], name: 'home',  moduleId: 'home/index' },
          { route: 'users',      name: 'users', moduleId: 'users/index', nav: true, title: 'Users' }
        ]);

        config.mapUnknownRoutes('not-found');
      }
    }
  

The above example will make any unmatched routes to load the not-found component module.

Using A Function For Unknown Routes

The function passed to mapUnknownRoutes() has to return:

  • A string representing moduleId.
  • An object with property moduleId of type string.
  • A RouteConfig object.
  • A Promise that resolves to any of the above.

    export class App {
      configureRouter(config, router) {
        this.router = router;
        config.title = 'Aurelia';

        const handleUnknownRoutes = (instruction) => {
            return { route: 'not-found', moduleId: 'not-found' };
        }

        config.mapUnknownRoutes(handleUnknownRoutes);

        config.map([
          { route: ['', 'home'], name: 'home',  moduleId: 'home/index' },
          { route: 'users',      name: 'users', moduleId: 'users/index', nav: true, title: 'Users' }
        ]);
      }
    }

  

    import {RouterConfiguration, NavigationInstruction, Router, RouteConfig} from 'aurelia-router';

    export class App {
      router: Router;

      configureRouter(config: RouterConfiguration, router: Router): void {
        this.router = router;
        config.title = 'Aurelia';

        const handleUnknownRoutes = (instruction: NavigationInstruction): RouteConfig => {
            return { route: 'not-found', moduleId: 'not-found' };
        }

        config.mapUnknownRoutes(handleUnknownRoutes);

        config.map([
          { route: ['', 'home'], name: 'home',  moduleId: 'home/index' },
          { route: 'users',      name: 'users', moduleId: 'users/index', nav: true, title: 'Users' }
        ]);
      }
    }
  

Redirecting Routes

Aurelia allows redirecting of routes to URL fragments by specifying redirect with a string consisting of a URL fragment.


    config.map([
      { route: '', redirect: 'home' },
      { route: 'home', name: 'home', moduleId: 'home/index' }
    ]);
  

Use Redirect On Empty Routes with Child Routers

The redirect is particularly useful when you have an "empty" route pattern (such as the first route above) that maps to a component with a child router. In this case, create a non-empty route and then redirect the empty route to the non-empty route (as above). This will enable the child router to consistently match child routes without getting confused in scenarios where the empty route was matched.

Pipelines

Aurelia has two router classes, AppRouter and Router. AppRouter extends the Router class and is the main application router. Router is used for any child routers including nested child routers. One of the main differences between the two is pipelines are only allowed on the AppRouter and not any child routers.

The default pipeline slots in order are authorize, preActivate, preRender, and postRender. For each slot, Aurelia has convenience functions for creating a pipeline step for these slots: addAuthorizeStep, addPreActivateStep, addPreRenderStep, addPostRenderStep. You can create your own pipeline steps using addPipelineStep, but the step's name must match one of the default pipeline's slots.

  • authorize is called between loading the route's step and calling the route view-model' canActivate function if defined.
  • preActivate is called between the route view-model' canActivate function and the previous route view-model's deactivate function if defined.
  • preRender is called between the route view-model's activate function and before the component is rendered/composed.
  • postRender is called after the component has been render/composed.

A pipeline step must be an object that contains a run(navigationInstruction, next) function.


    import {Redirect} from 'aurelia-router';

    export class App {
      configureRouter(config) {
        config.addAuthorizeStep(AuthorizeStep);
        config.map([
          { route: ['', 'home'],       name: 'home',       moduleId: 'home/index' },
          { route: 'users',            name: 'users',      moduleId: 'users/index',  settings: { auth: true } },
          { route: 'users/:id/detail', name: 'userDetail', moduleId: 'users/detail', settings: { auth: true } }
        ]);
      }
    }

    class AuthorizeStep {
      run(navigationInstruction, next) {
        if (navigationInstruction.getAllInstructions().some(i => i.config.settings.auth)) {
          var isLoggedIn = // insert magic here;
          if (!isLoggedIn) {
            return next.cancel(new Redirect('login'));
          }
        }

        return next();
      }
    }
  

    import {RouterConfiguration, NavigationInstruction, Next, Redirect} from 'aurelia-router';

    export class App {
      configureRouter(config: RouterConfiguration): void {
        config.addAuthorizeStep(AuthorizeStep);
        config.map([
          { route: ['', 'home'],       name: 'home',       moduleId: 'home/index' },
          { route: 'users',            name: 'users',      moduleId: 'users/index',  settings: { auth: true } },
          { route: 'users/:id/detail', name: 'userDetail', moduleId: 'users/detail', settings: { auth: true } }
        ]);
      }
    }

    class AuthorizeStep {
      run(navigationInstruction: NavigationInstruction, next: Next): Promise<any> {
        if (navigationInstruction.getAllInstructions().some(i => i.config.settings.auth)) {
          var isLoggedIn = //insert magic here;
          if (!isLoggedIn) {
            return next.cancel(new Redirect('login'));
          }
        }

        return next();
      }
    }
  

    export class App {
      configureRouter(config) {
        function step() {
          return step.run;
        }
        step.run = (navigationInstruction, next) => {
          return next();
        };
        config.addPreActivateStep(step)
        config.map([
          { route: ['', 'home'], name: 'home',  moduleId: 'home/index' },
          { route: 'users',      name: 'users', moduleId: 'users/index', nav: true, title: 'Users' }
        ]);
      }
    }
  

    import {RouterConfiguration, NavigationInstruction, Next} from 'aurelia-router';

    export class App {
      configureRouter(config: RouterConfiguration): void {
        function step() {
          return step.run;
        }
        step.run = (navigationInstruction: NavigationInstruction, next: Next): Promise<any> {
          return next();
        };
        config.addPreActivateStep(step);
        config.map([
          { route: ['', 'home'], name: 'home',  moduleId: 'home/index' },
          { route: 'users',      name: 'users', moduleId: 'users/index', nav: true, title: 'Users' }
        ]);
      }
    }
  

    export class App {
      configureRouter(config) {
        const step = {
          run(navigationInstruction, next) {
            return next();
          }
        };
        config.addPreRenderStep(step);
        config.map([
          { route: ['', 'home'], name: 'home',  moduleId: 'home/index' },
          { route: 'users',      name: 'users', moduleId: 'users/index', nav: true, title: 'Users' }
        ]);
      }
    }
  

    import {RouterConfiguration, NavigationInstruction, Next} from 'aurelia-router';

    export class App {
      configureRouter(config: RouterConfiguration): void {
        const step = {
          run(navigationInstruction: NavigationInstruction, next: Next): Promise<any> {
            return next();
          }
        };
        config.addPreRenderStep(step);
        config.map([
          { route: ['', 'home'], name: 'home',  moduleId: 'home/index' },
          { route: 'users',      name: 'users', moduleId: 'users/index', nav: true, title: 'Users' }
        ]);
      }
    }
  

    export class App {
      configureRouter(config) {
        const step = {
          run(navigationInstruction, next) {
            return next();
          }
        };
        config.addPostRenderStep(step);
        config.map([
          { route: ['', 'home'], name: 'home',  moduleId: 'home/index' },
          { route: 'users',      name: 'users', moduleId: 'users/index', nav: true, title: 'Users' }
        ]);
      }
    }
  

    import {RouterConfiguration, NavigationInstruction, Next} from 'aurelia-router';

    export class App {
      configureRouter(config: RouterConfiguration): void {
        const step = {
          run(navigationInstruction: NavigationInstruction, next: Next): Promise<any> {
            return next();
          }
        };
        config.addPostRenderStep(step);
        config.map([
          { route: ['', 'home'], name: 'home',  moduleId: 'home/index' },
          { route: 'users',      name: 'users', moduleId: 'users/index', nav: true, title: 'Users' }
        ]);
      }
    }
  

Rendering View Ports

Every instance of a router-view custom element essentially defines a "view port". When you give a router-view a name, you can refer to it in the viewPorts property of the route configuration in your javascript. The value of a viewPorts property is an object where each property name is the name of a view port (ie, router-view) and each value is the moduleId destination of the route. Thus you can specify any number of view ports on a single route configuration.

If you don't name a router-view, it will be available under the name 'default'.

Following is an example of the use of view ports:


    <template>
      <div>
        <router-view name="left"></router-view>
      </div>
      <div>
        <router-view name="right"></router-view>
      </div>
    </template>
  

    export class App {
      configureRouter(config) {
        config.title = 'Aurelia';
        config.map([
          { route: 'users', name: 'users', viewPorts: { left: { moduleId: 'user/list' }, right: { moduleId: 'user/detail' } } }
        ]);
      }
    }
  

    import {RouterConfiguration} from 'aurelia-router';

    export class App {
      configureRouter(config: RouterConfiguration): void {
        config.title = 'Aurelia';
        config.map([
          { route: 'users', name: 'users', viewPorts: { left: { moduleId: 'user/list' }, right: { moduleId: 'user/detail' } } }
        ]);
      }
    }
  

Empty View Ports

You can empty a view port by setting moduleId null in the route configuration for that view port.


    export class App {
      configureRouter(config) {
        config.title = 'Aurelia';
        config.map([
          { route: 'users', name: 'users', viewPorts: { left: { moduleId: 'user/list' }, right: { moduleId: null } } }
        ]);
      }
    }
  

    import {RouterConfiguration} from 'aurelia-router';

    export class App {
      configureRouter(config: RouterConfiguration): void {
        config.title = 'Aurelia';
        config.map([
          { route: 'users', name: 'users', viewPorts: { left: { moduleId: 'user/list' }, right: { moduleId: null } } }
        ]);
      }
    }
  

View Port Defaults

The empty view port is actually the out-of-the-box default. You can override this default to load a specific moduleId whenever moduleId is null by passing a view port configuration to the router configuration. These overrides can be set specifically to each view port.


    export class App {
      configureRouter(config) {
        config.title = 'Aurelia';
        config.map([
          { route: 'users', name: 'users', viewPorts: { left: { moduleId: 'user/list' }, right: { moduleId: null } } }
        ]);
        config.useViewPortDefaults({
          right: { moduleId: 'pages/placeholder' }
        })
      }
    }
  

    import {RouterConfiguration} from 'aurelia-router';

    export class App {
      configureRouter(config: RouterConfiguration): void {
        config.title = 'Aurelia';
        config.map([
          { route: 'users', name: 'users', viewPorts: { left: { moduleId: 'user/list' }, right: { moduleId: null } } }
        ]);
        config.useViewPortDefaults({
          right: { moduleId: 'pages/placeholder' }
        })
      }
    }
  

Optional View Ports

If a view port configuration is not defined on a route, the router will skip routing on that particular view port leaving the view port untouched. If there is no existing content in the view port, i.e. when the application is first loaded, the view port will be populated with the view port default configuration, which is empty if not otherwise specified (see View Port Defaults).


    export class App {
      configureRouter(config) {
        config.title = 'Aurelia';
        config.map([
          { route: 'users', name: 'users', viewPorts: { left: { moduleId: 'user/list' } } }
        ]);
        config.useViewPortDefaults({
          right: { moduleId: 'pages/placeholder' }
        })
      }
    }
  

    import {RouterConfiguration} from 'aurelia-router';

    export class App {
      configureRouter(config: RouterConfiguration): void {
        config.title = 'Aurelia';
        config.map([
          { route: 'users', name: 'users', viewPorts: { left: { moduleId: 'user/list' } } }
        ]);
        config.useViewPortDefaults({
          right: { moduleId: 'pages/placeholder' }
        })
      }
    }
  

In addition to the moduleId, you can also specify a "layout" in the configuration of a view port (see Layouts ).

Layouts

Similar to MVC-style master/layout pages, Aurelia allows you to use a "layout" view like an MVC "master template" for a set of views.

The set of views subject to being part of a layout is defined in Aurelia as a set of views referenced by one or more routes in a router configuration. There are two ways to associate a layout with routes. The first is via HTML, the second is via view model code.

We're going to be a little sloppy here in terminology. Technically, routes refer to "moduleIds", not "views". Since the router resolves a moduleId to a view, indirectly the router does reference a view. It is easy to picture a view visually contained within a layout, so in this topic to we'll refer to views referenced by a route, not modules.

We'll look at using HTML first. We know that the router-view custom HTML element is always associated with a set of one or more views referenced in a router configuration given in its parent view's view model. By associating a layout with a router-view one can thus associate a layout with the same set of views with which the router-view is associated.

To specify a layout on the router-view custom element, we use the following attributes:

  • layout-view - specifies the file name (with path) of the layout view to use.
  • layout-view-model - specifies the moduleId of the view model to use with the layout view.
  • layout-model - specifies the model parameter to pass to the layout view model's activate function.

All of these layout attributes are bindable.

Following is an example of HTML in which we specify that we want all destination views reachable under the router-view to be laid-out inside a view with file name layout.html, located in the same directory as the view contianing the router-view:


    <template>
      <div>
        <router-view layout-view="layout.html"></router-view>
      </div>
    </template>
  

Here is the layout view itself:


    <template>
      <div class="left-content">
        <slot name="left-content"></slot>
      </div>
      <div class="right-content">
        <slot name="right-content"></slot>
      </div>
    </template>
  

And here we define a view that we want to appear within the layout:


    <template>
      <div slot="left-content">
        <p>${leftMessage}.</p>
      </div>
      <div slot="right-content">
        <p>${rightMessage}.</p>
      </div>
      <div>This will not be displayed in the layout because it is not contained in any named slot referenced by the layout.</div>
    </template>
  

    export class Home {
      constructor() {
        this.leftMessage = "I'm content that will show up on the left";
        this.rightMessage = "I'm content that will show up on the right";
      }
    }
  

    export class Home {
      leftMessage: string;
      rightMessage: string;

      constructor() {
        this.leftMessage = "I'm content that will show up on the left";
        this.rightMessage = "I'm content that will show up on the right";
      }
    }
  

Observe how we use the slot mechanism for associating parts of the layout to parts of the views that are to be contained within the layout. (Happy for developers, this is conveniently the same mechanism and syntax we use in Aurelia when providing content to custom elements.)

Now we just have to define the route configuration that will be associated with the router-view:


    export class App {
      configureRouter(config, router) {
        config.map([
          { route: '', name: 'home', moduleId: 'home' }
        ]);

        this.router = router;
      }
    }
  

    import {RouterConfiguration, Router} from 'aurelia-router';

    export class App {
      router: Router;

      configureRouter(config: RouterConfiguration, router: Router): void {
        config.map([
          { route: '', name: 'home', moduleId: 'home' }
        ]);

        this.router = router;
      }
    }
  

Thus when we navigate to the module "home" we find that it is laid-out as desired inside the layout view.

Note there is nothing different about the above route configuration with or without the layout. It may reference any number of views that would all be included by default in the layout.

So that is how we use HTML to associate a layout view with a set of views referenced in a router configuration.

We can also associate layouts with route configurations using code in our view model. Suppose we like what we've done above, but we have a couple views that we would like to associate with a different layout and would thus like to partially override the configuration given in the HTML. The following code is an example of how we can do that:


    export class App {
      configureRouter(config, router) {
        config.map([
          { route: '',      name: 'home',  moduleId: 'home' },
          { route: 'login', name: 'login', moduleId: 'login/index', layoutView: 'layout-login.html' },
          { route: 'users', name: 'users', moduleId: 'users/index', layoutModel: 'layout-users', layoutViewModel: { access: "admin" } }
        ]);

        this.router = router;
      }
    }
  

    import {RouterConfiguration, Router} from 'aurelia-router';

    export class App {
      configureRouter(config: RouterConfiguration, router: Router): void {
        config.map([
          { route: '',      name: 'home',  moduleId: 'home' },
          { route: 'login', name: 'login', moduleId: 'login/index', layoutView: 'layout-login.html' },
          { route: 'users', name: 'users', moduleId: 'users/index', layoutModel: 'layout-users', layoutViewModel: { access: "admin" } }
        ]);

        this.router = router;
      }
    }
  

The above example will assign different layouts to the "login" and "users" views, overriding the HTML while leaving "home" to remain as configured in the HTML. Noticing we're using camel-cased property names here, unlike in the HTML.

You can also specify a layout in the viewPorts configuration of a route. See a simple example, below:


    <template>
      <div>
        <router-view name="myRouterView"></router-view>
      </div>
    </template>
  

    export class App {
      configureRouter(config, router) {
        config.map([
          { route: '', name: 'home', viewPorts: { myRouterView: { moduleId: 'home', layoutView: 'default.html' } } }
        ]);

        this.router = router;
      }
    }
  

    import {RouterConfiguration, Router} from 'aurelia-router';

    export class App {
      router: Router;

      configureRouter(config: RouterConfiguration, router: Router): void {){
        config.map([
          { route: '', name: 'home', viewPorts: { myRouterView: { moduleId: 'home', layoutView: 'default.html' } } }
        ]);

        this.router = router;
      }
    }
  

View Swapping and Animation

When the Aurelia router navigates from one view to another, we refer to this as "swapping" one view for another. Aurelia gives us an optional set of strategies dictating how a swap proceeds, or more specifically, how animation plays out during the swap. We refer to these strategies more precisely as the "swap order".

If there is no animation defined, then swap-order has no visible impact.

You can apply a swap strategy to one or more routes by applying the swap-order attribute to a router-view custom HTML element. The strategy will then be applied in any transition between two views accessible under the router-view.

swap-order is bindable.

The following swap order strategies are available:

  • before - animate the next view in before removing the current view
  • with - animate the next view at the same time the current view is removed
  • after - animate the next view in after the current view has been removed (the default)

Here is an example of setting the swap order strategy on a router-view:


    <template>
      <div>
        <router-view swap-order="before"></router-view>
      </div>
    </template>
  

Internationalizing Titles

If your application targets multiple cultures or languages, you probably want to translate your route titles. The Router class has a transformTitle property that can be used for this. It is expected to be assigned a function that takes the active route's title as a parameter and then returns the translated title. For example, if your app uses aurelia-i18n, its routes' titles would typically be set to some translation keys and the AppRouter's transformTitle would be configured in such a way that the active route's title is translated using the I18N's tr method. Additionally you can listen to a custom event published by the I18N service to react on locale changes using the EventAggregator:


    import Backend from 'i18next-xhr-backend';
    import {AppRouter} from 'aurelia-router';
    import {EventAggregator} from 'aurelia-event-aggregator';

    export function configure(aurelia) {
      aurelia.use
        .standardConfiguration()
        .plugin('aurelia-i18n', i18n => {
          i18n.i18next.use(Backend);

          return i18n.setup({
            backend: {
              loadPath: './locales/{{lng}}.json',
            },
            lng : 'en',
            fallbackLng : 'en'
          }).then(() => {
            const router = aurelia.container.get(AppRouter);
            router.transformTitle = title => i18n.tr(title);

            const eventAggregator = aurelia.container.get(EventAggregator);
            eventAggregator.subscribe('i18n:locale:changed', () => {
              router.updateTitle();
            });
          });
        });

      aurelia.start().then(() => aurelia.setRoot());
    }
  

    import Backend from 'i18next-xhr-backend';
    import {Aurelia} from 'aurelia-framework';
    import {AppRouter} from 'aurelia-router';
    import {EventAggregator} from 'aurelia-event-aggregator';

    export function configure(aurelia: Aurelia) {
      aurelia.use
        .standardConfiguration()
        .plugin('aurelia-i18n', i18n => {
          i18n.i18next.use(Backend);

          return i18n.setup({
            backend: {
              loadPath: './locales/{{lng}}.json',
            },
            lng : 'en',
            fallbackLng : 'en'
          }).then(() => {
            const router = aurelia.container.get(AppRouter);
            router.transformTitle = title => i18n.tr(title);

            const eventAggregator = aurelia.container.get(EventAggregator);
            eventAggregator.subscribe('i18n:locale:changed', () => {
              router.updateTitle();
            });
          });
        });

      aurelia.start().then(() => aurelia.setRoot());
    }
  

    {
      "titles": {
        "app": "My App",
        "home": "Home"
      }
    }
  

    export class App {
      configureRouter(config, router) {
        this.router = router;
        config.title = 'titles.app';
        config.map([
          { route: ['', 'home'], name: 'home', moduleId: 'home', title: 'titles.home' }
        ]);
      }
    }
  

    import {RouterConfiguration, Router} from 'aurelia-router';

    export class App {
      router: Router;

      configureRouter(config: RouterConfiguration, router: Router): void {
        this.router = router;
        config.title = 'titles.app';
        config.map([
          { route: ['', 'home'], name: 'home', moduleId: 'home', title: 'titles.home' }
        ]);
      }
    }
  

The default value of thetransformTitle property does the following:

  • For the child Router, it delegates to its parent's transformTitle function.
  • For the AppRouter, it returns the title untransformed.

In the previous example, the AppRouter's transformTitle is set, so all child Routers will delegate down to it by default. However, this means that the transformTitle can be overridden for specific child Routers if some areas of your app need custom transformation.

Configuring a Fallback Route

Whenever navigation is rejected, it is redirected to a previous location. However in certain cases a previous location doesn't exist, e.g. when it happens as the first navigation after the startup of application. To handle this scenario, you can set up a fallback route.


    export class App {
      configureRouter(config, router) {
        this.router = router;
        config.title = 'Aurelia';
        config.map([
          { route: ['', 'home'], name: 'home',  moduleId: 'home/index' },
          { route: 'users',      name: 'users', moduleId: 'users/index', nav: true, title: 'Users' }
        ]);

        config.fallbackRoute('users');
      }
    }
  

    import {RouterConfiguration, Router} from 'aurelia-router';

    export class App {
      router: Router;

      configureRouter(config: RouterConfiguration, router: Router): void {
        this.router = router;
        config.title = 'Aurelia';
        config.map([
          { route: ['', 'home'], name: 'home',  moduleId: 'home/index' },
          { route: 'users',      name: 'users', moduleId: 'users/index', nav: true, title: 'Users' }
        ]);

        config.fallbackRoute('users');
      }
    }
  

Reusing an Existing View Model

Since the view model's navigation lifecycle is called only once, you may have problems recognizing that the user switched the route from Product A to Product B (see below). To work around this issue implement the method determineActivationStrategy in your view model and return hints for the router about what you'd like to happen. Available return values are replace and invoke-lifecycle. Remember, "lifecycle" refers to the navigation lifecycle.


    //app.js

    export class App {
      configureRouter(config) {
        config.title = 'Aurelia';
        config.map([
          { route: 'product/a',    moduleId: 'product',     nav: true },
          { route: 'product/b',    moduleId: 'product',     nav: true },
        ]);
      }
    }

    //product.js

    import {activationStrategy} from 'aurelia-router';

    export class Product {
      determineActivationStrategy() {
        return activationStrategy.replace;
      }
    }
  

    import {RouterConfiguration} from 'aurelia-router';

    //app.ts

    export class App {
      configureRouter(config: RouterConfiguration): void {
        config.title = 'Aurelia';
        config.map([
          { route: 'product/a',    moduleId: 'product',     nav: true },
          { route: 'product/b',    moduleId: 'product',     nav: true },
        ]);
      }
    }

    //product.ts

    import {activationStrategy, RoutableComponentDetermineActivationStrategy} from 'aurelia-router';

    export class Product implements RoutableComponentDetermineActivationStrategy {
      determineActivationStrategy() {
        return activationStrategy.replace;
      }
    }
  

Alternatively, if the strategy is always the same and you don't want that to be in your view model code, you can add the activationStrategy property to your route config instead.